1/48 scale destroyed T-34

With my buildings mostly completed, rubble figured out and a gaming cloth I finally like; thank you Cigar Box I have turned my attention to upgrading my scatter terrain. I have a tram car, and a few Lledo diecast model T’s but I wanted something to act as a focal point and also provide a modeling challenge. One of my favorite images is a tank fighting on the streets of a city and to really make it interesting I wanted it destroyed.  I was surprised by the lack of kits with full interiors; I know 1/48 isn’t the scale for tanks but other than a Verlinden and the kit from Hobby Boss I didn’t see many options. I went with the Hobby Boss T-34; mostly because it’s an inexpensive kit that’s ready available with lots of details. The kit has 400 parts and some of them small and fragile.

The kit certainly bought back some memories of building model kits when I was a kids. I also realized I had evolved into a war gamer and not a model builder. I broke a few parts, dropped a few parts and left a few parts off. The details were interesting, full engine, turret and fighting compartment details. I also feel like I know a lot more about the inner parts of a T-34.

                With assembly mostly completed, for ease of painting I left the road wheels and hull lose, I shot the parts with a coat of primer.  Nothing fancy here, just the Taymia white. I wanted to give this vehicle a burnt out look so I mixed up some various rust tones using the Vallejo Pigments and sprayed them on with the airbrush. Again, nothing fancy, just a little water and pigment mixed up and sprayed over the vehicle with the airbrush. I let that dry, then coated with some semi-gloss sealant.

The real test for this project was the trying to figure out how to use the hairspray chipping technique.  This is one of those tools the high end 1/35 modelers use to get realistic looking chipping effects. The look is far more subtle than the sponge method because it’s an actual chip of paint missing. I have been reading up on and watching videos on the hairspray chipping technique and the basics are not hard. I gave the sealant a week to fully cure and coated the tank in a nice even coat of hairspray. Once that was dry I pulled out the Vallejo 4BO modulation kit.

I went light with this process, it’s tempting to go big with the color modulation and it looks good in the picture but I find too much is wholly in accurate. After I was complete with the five colors I let it cure for a bit and ready my tooth picks, stiff brush and water.

The way I do this is to splash on some water onto the kit and give the paint a little scratch. The scratch allows the water to flow under the second layer of paint and reactivate the hair spray. This allows you to start to wipe way the paint. Once thing I did run into was issues with the thickness of the paint, the multiple layer of acrylic paints built up a rubbery thickness which wasn’t easy to work with. I think next time I will try to use Taymia paints, they have a lighter consistency and flake away cleanly. This is also what Michael Rinaldi uses; the guy who techniques I used.

With chipping done it was time to add some wreathing and rusting. For this I went back to my Vallejo rust collection and dry applied this to the engine, the exposed burn marks and tracks. On the exposed green I added a little filter and called it a day.

With chipping done it was time to add some wreathing and rusting. For this I went back to my Vallejo rust collection and dry applied this to the engine, the exposed burn marks and tracks. On the exposed green I added a little filter and called it a day.

The base is MDF, with some embossed paper glued to it.

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